Sociodemographic Factors and Oral Health Conditions in Drug Users

Suzanne Kaelinne Pereira da Costa, Gustavo Pina Godoy, Daliana Queiroga de Gomes, Jozinete Vieira Pereira, Ruthinéia Diógenes Alves Uchôa Lins

Abstract


Objective: To identify clinically and by using an anamnestic questionnaire the oral health conditions of drug users and their relations with social and demographic factors.
Methods: This investigation was a descriptive cross-sectional study with an inductive approach. The sample consisted of 70 patients who sought treatment at CAPS-ad (Psychosocial Attention Center - alcohol and other drugs). The data were systematically collected by a previously calibrated single examiner, by clinical examination and application of a specific form for the identification and classification of eventual alterations.
Results: The collected data revealed that the patients had a mean age of 40.44 years; there was predominance of males (90%); more than half the patients were Caucasian (57.1); the educational level was low; the most consumed drugs were, respectively, alcohol (68.6%), marijuana (17.1%), cocaine (7.1%), crack (4.3%) and psychotropic drugs (2.8%); most drug users presented poor oral health; they were drug addicts for over 5 years; the poor oral health could associated with general negligence with personal hygiene due to the abusive drug use. Additionally, it was observed that the longer the drug-addition, the poorer the oral health (p= 0.002) and that their poor oral health was related to their oral hygiene habits (p=0.029).
Conclusion: The study pointed to the need of including dental professionals in the rehabilitation programs offered to these patients for developing oral health promotion and recovery programs that can improve their quality of life.

Keywords


Usuários de drogas; Saúde bucal; Manifestações bucais; Drug users; Oral health; Oral manifestations.



DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4034/pboci.v11i1.1263

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