Dietary Habits and Early Childhood Caries in Children Treated at a Brazilian Dental School

Flávia Almeida Ribeiro SCALIONI, Soraya Rabelo FIGUEIREDO, Wanessa Botega CURCIO, Renata Tolêdo ALVES, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves LEITE, Rosangela Almeida RIBEIRO

Abstract


Objective: To evaluate the association between dietary habits and presence of early childhood caries (ECC) in a group of children treated at a public University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.
Method: Sixty-nine children (30 boys and 39 girls) aged 13 to 60 months were enrolled in the styudy. The dmf-t index was determined by a single trained examiner (kappa coefficient = 1), according to criteria preconized by the World Health Organization. A three-day diet journal was filled out by parents and/or caregivers to collect data from the children’s diet. The statistical analysis included the chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests, followed by multiple logistic regression analysis. A significance level of 5% was adopted (α = 0.05).
Results: ECC was diagnosed in 87% of the sample (60/69 children). A mean dmf-t index of 9.20 was recorded. The mean frequency of ingestion of carbon hydrates was high (more than five times a day) for 82.6% of the children (57/69). There was no significant association between frequency of sugar ingestion and presence of caries (p=0.183). The multiple logistic regression model revealed an inverse association between consumption of “other foods” and absence of caries (p=0.02). These results suggest the need of dietary counseling with respect to the consumption of certain foods associated with ECC in the studied sample.
Conclusion: The high mean frequency of ingestion of a cariogenic diet was not associated with the presence of ECC, and the consumption of certain foods was related to the absence of the disease.

Keywords


Cárie Dentária; Dieta Cariogênica; Açúcar; Criança; Pré-escolar.



DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4034/pboci.v12i3.1352

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