Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Brackets After Thermal Recycling by Direct Flaming

Suci Novianti, Erwin Siregar, Haru Setyo Anggani

Abstract


Objective:To determine and compare the corrosion resistance (based on the release of nickel and chromium in artificial saliva) of various brands of stainless steel brackets after thermal recycling by direct flaming. Material and Methods:This research study employed 40 stainless-steel maxillary premolar brackets from different brands (Ormco, GAC, Versadent, S-Ortho, and Protect), which were divided into 5 groups consisting of 8 brackets. The nickel and chromium content of the metal brackets were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), conducted before immersion. For the first treatment, each group was immersed in artificial saliva without direct flaming (recycling); for the second treatment, each group was immersed in artificial saliva with direct flaming (recycling) for 30 days in a pH-neutral (pH=7) solution. ICP-MS was employed to analyze the nickel and chromium released in saliva. The mean differences were measured with Wilcoxon, Kruskal Wallis test, and Post-Hoc Mann Whitney test. Differences were considered statistically significant when p-value<0.05. Results:The mean corrosion resistance based on the nickel content released by the new brackets was 99.95%, 99.87%, 87.09%, 90.58%, and 90.26% for groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively. The mean corrosion resistance based on the nickel content released by the recycled brackets was 99.90%, 99.80%, 98.19%, 89.76%, and 72.82%, respectively. There was a significant difference in corrosion resistance among the 5 groups after recycling by direct flaming and between new and recycled brackets in each group. Conclusion:The corrosion resistance of the brackets in groups A (Ormco), B (GAC), D (S-Ortho), and E (Protect) decreased after thermal recycling by direct flaming. The Ormcobrackets had the highest corrosion resistance after thermal recycling by direct faming.

Keywords


Orthodontic Brackets; Stainless Steel; Nickel; Chromium; Corrosion

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References


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https://doi.org/10.4103/0975-7406.113279




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4034/PBOCI.2019.191.98

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